Episode Fifteen - 1st Assistant Chief Lashinda Stair

The Detroit Public Safety Foundation is celebrating "Women In Blue" for the month of May. The Women in Blue program is a celebration of the women within the Detroit Police Department, Detroit Fire Department and EMS. This week I chatted with the highest ranking female officer within the Detroit Police Department. Meet 1st Assistant Chief Lashinda Stair.
1st Assistant Chief Stair advises and encourages all officers (especially female officers) and actively supports and mentors young people. She’s intricately involved in the DPD’s Women in Blue and Women Behind the Badge initiatives, honoring female officers for their contributions to Detroit. She actively encourages women to consider a career in law enforcement. Listen to the podcast to hear why she is a "WCSX Woman Who Rocks"

1st Assistant Chief Stair has also been featured in Forbes magazine and strives to connect the department with the community and its' residents.

Eight Women Leaders On Their Mentor's Best Advice

My favorite take on mentorship is from Audrey MacLean, a founder, investor and consulting associate professor at Stanford University School of Engineering. When asked for advice, she responds, "I don't necessarily want to dole out advice but I'm happy to share some used wisdom."

1st Assistant Chief Stair is a mom, a mentor and makes it a point to help other women achieve their goals with in the department and in their everyday lives.

 

Detroit Police Dept. on Twitter

This week, in honor of #WomensHistoryMonth2018, 1st Assistant Chief Lashinda Stair shares leadership lessons learned along the "Stair Way to Success!" https://t.co/nP2RP5G85U

For more information on the "Women in Blue" celebration and to purchase tickets to the event, just click here. Judge Rosemarie Aquilina, who presided over the Larry Nassar trial, will be the keynote speaker. She imposed a 40 to 175 year prison sentence on the serial sex abuser.

In the 2nd half of the podcast Cyndy Schalter-Salsido from Turning Point Macomb and I discuss "Mental Health Awareness" Month.

Understanding our #B4Stage4 Philosophy

When we think about cancer, heart disease, or diabetes, we don't wait years to treat them. We start way before Stage 4. We begin with prevention. And when people are in the first stage of those diseases, and have a persistent cough, high blood pressure, or high blood sugar, we try immediately to reverse these symptoms. This is what we should be doing when people have serious mental illnesses, too.

When we think about cancer, heart disease, or diabetes, we don’t wait years to treat them. We start way before Stage 4. We begin with prevention. And when people are in the first stage of those diseases, and have a persistent cough, high blood pressure, or high blood sugar, we try immediately to reverse these symptoms.

This is what we should be doing when people have serious mental illnesses, too. When they first begin to experience symptoms such as loss of sleep, feeling tired for no reason, feeling low, feeling anxious, or hearing voices, we should act.

These early symptoms might not ever become serious. Like a cough, they often go away on their own, and are nothing to fear. But when they do not go away, it typically takes ten years from the time they first appear until someone gets a correct diagnosis and proper treatment.

Cyndy and I also discuss how celebrities who have spoken about their mental health problems are helping to raise awareness and change the perception of people with mental illness. Cyndy specifically mentioned rapper Kanye West who has had a history of mental health problems and recently admitted he had a mental breakdown.

Kanye West Opened Up About His Mental Health

After a lot of speculation surrounding his mental health, Kanye West finally addressed the topic head on. In a new interview, he opened up about his experience with mental health and why he wants to remove the stigma surrounding it.


(Cyndy Schalter-Salsido)

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