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CHARLESTON, SC - SEPTEMBER 5: A man walks along the Charleston Battery as Hurricane Dorian spins just off shore on September 5, 2019 in Charleston, South Carolina. Hurricane Dorian is now at Category 2 strength as it makes its way up the U.S. East Coast, unleashing flooding, high winds and tornadoes, according to published reports. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

This Beasley Best Community of Caring report urges you to donate to efforts to help the Bahamas after the devastation of Hurricane Dorian. Read more below and please consider donating to Red Cross efforts HERE

After causing major damage in the Bahamas, Hurricane Dorian has made landfall in North Carolina. On Friday (Sept. 6), Dorian, now a Category 1 storm with 90 mph hurricane force-winds, made landfall over Cape Hatteras, N.C. in the Outer Banks, according to the New York Times. After missing Florida and Georgia, Cape Hatteras marks Dorian’s first landfall on U.S. mainland.

While Dorian has lost strength in recent days, the Associated Press warns that the storm is still dangerous. On Thursday, North Carolina experienced 15 tornados, according to CBS News. North Carolina’s coast is already getting battered by torrential rain and the barrier islands are facing “historic water levels.”

The storm surge on the Outer Banks could reach the heights of a one-story building, according to forecasters. “Do not let your guard down,” Dare County emergency managers warned those who chose to ride out the storm, per the AP.

Dorian is expected to remain a hurricane as it moves up the U.S. east coast this weekend, but its hurricane-force winds are not expected to reach land. The Weather Channel reported that a tropical storm warning has been issued for southeast Massachusetts. Hurricane warnings have also been issued for parts of Canada.

Earlier this week, the storm brought devastating damage to the Bahamas, killing at least 30 people and demolishing countless homes. AP reported that at least four people in the southeast have died in preparation of the storm.